Tuesday, April 26, 2011

V is for Voice

Hey, gang! I'm coming at ya from spring break on Daytona Beach. Kids are enjoying sun and fun while I work. *frowns* But that's the beauty of my job, I can take it with me.

So yesterday I asked the question what makes a book unputdownable. My answer included voice, as did many others. Voice is so so important in drawing the reader into  the storytelling. Everyone has their own description of what voice is. And I've read so many, I agree with all of them. For me, discovering my voice became easier with each story I wrote.

By George! I think I've got it now! And my voice doesn't always come through in the first draft, but with revisions I focus on tweaking my voice, as well as the characters' voices. It gets clearer and easier each time.

I could go into detail about what I think voice is, but I'd rather direct you to a post by a fellow blogger, who is so crystal clear on the subject, I couldn't say it better myself.

Check out Lisa Gail Green at Paranormal Point of View's blog post on Filtering through Character. It just rocks.

Do you have any techniques you use to develop your voice? Any tips? If not, what are you working on these days?

23 comments:

welcome to my world of poetry said...

Enjoyed the read, A good word for letter V.

Have fun.
Yvonne.

Rogue Mutt said...

I considered writing an entry today "V is for Venereal Disease" but then I thought people might not entry reading about herpes.

Summer Ross said...

great post PK. Voice- ha! I'm not sure what mine is but I'm always working to find it.

Norma Beishir said...

I'm going to plead stupidity. I know it's there, but it's always been there. It's just come naturally.

I would read the one about VD....

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

No, but I'm willing to listen to anyone who does have tips!

DM said...

I now record myself reading and then play it back. This helps tremendously with voice. It's amazaing the changes I make when I hear it.

E.J. Wesley said...

I think you stole my 'V'! lol

Voice is such a tricky concept to get a wrangle on. I'm not sure, but maybe the only real way to develop it is to just write a ton of stuff. I think you can mimic voice or style if you read enough, but obtaining a truly unique voice in your writing seems to take lots of, well, writing (i.e. trial and error).

Old Kitty said...

For me the best way to strengthen my feeble writer-ly voice is to do many many revisions and edits! :-)

Enjoy your break!! Don't work too hard! Take care
x

fOIS In The City said...

I have to agree with Norma. It's something that comes naturally to each character as they develop in a story. The only way I could describe it would be ... the voice ... like you ... is an outgrowth of who they are.

You are so close to the end ... get through WXYZ and you're home :)

Madeleine said...

Yay for voice, will check out the link :O)

Lindsay N. Currie said...

Great post! Voice sounds so mysterious, doesn't it? Glad to see you tackled it!

Michael Di Gesu said...

IT'S what everyone wants .... to achieve that unmistakeable voice that sets you apart from the millions of other writer's.... Oh if we can only bottle the secret!

M.J. Fifield said...

Trial and error works best for me.

Enjoy your vacation...

Laura said...

Great post - and fab link too - how cool was that post?! I find that my voice comes through the more often I write - the first month after re-starting tends to be fairly bland until my brain gets out of the way and that direct link forms from imagination through to fingertips
Hope you are having fun and thanks for your comment!
Lx

Tony Van Helsing said...

Good post and thanks for the link. Finding a voice can take time and effort as I'm sure you know.

Barbara Kloss said...

That was a great link - thanks for sharing. "Voice" is my archnemisis. Well, it feels that way with the amount of work I've had to do in order to find it.

Shari said...

I. Am. So. Jealous! You got to spend spring break on the beach?! I spent mine on a farm. How much of a loser does that make me?

Love your post on voice. It really makes a huge difference in connecting you to a story.

Josh Hoyt said...

This is so true about voice. The thing that I like about it is that it is so individual for each writer. Thanks for the link.

Geof said...

When I lived in FL, my friend used to have a timeshare, so I got to got to Daytona a bit.

The ability to work remotely is such a treasure (at least it something I truly cherish), so please make sure to get out in the sun for some fun at some point when the work is done.

Libby said...

Voice is terribly important. I wonder how much an author's voice changes with age, experiences, etc?

LTM said...

argh--agent said "write while you wait," and I said... hahahahaha... But I actually did sit down and write Chapter 1 of the sequel, so tah dah!

Girl, this post is so great. I can just see how you're getting to be such a great writer! Can't wait to hear about your agent success story~ :o) <3

mgudlewski said...

The examples in the "Filtering Through Character" link were A+. Showing is better than telling, especially when teaching that elusive necessity called Voice. Thanks for the link, PK.

Melissa Bradley said...

When I'm trying to find the voice of my story, I start with the main characters. I write their bios in first person so I can get a feel for how they speak and I go from there. Off to check out Lisa's post. Have fun on your vacation!